Black and Missing Part. 4

According to the article, “The faces of the forgotten: Heartbreaking plight of the 64,000 black women missing across America… as the country turns a blind eye,” 40% of missing persons are black:

article-2088428-0F83E8CF00000578-815_634x422
Photo from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2088428/The-shocking–forgotten–toll-missing-black-women-U-S.html

Currently, 64,000 black women are missing. Thanks to organizations such as Black and Missing But Not Forgotten and the television show “Find Our Missing,” there has been renewed interest in finding these women. However, missing black women still tend to be ignored by mainstream media in favor of white female stories:

“Missing white woman syndrome is a phrase coined by social scientists to describe the extensive media coverage, especially in television, of missing person cases that involve young, white, upper-middle class women or girls.[1] Sociologists define the phenomenon as an undue focus on young, white women who disappear, with the disproportionate degree of media coverage they receive being compared to cases concerning missing women of other ethnicities, socioeconomic classes, or with missing males.[2][3] The PBS news anchor Gwen Ifill is said to be the originator of the phrase.[3]”    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missing_white_woman_syndrome

Black women have been so “othered” in our society, people don’t take our  issues seriously.   We generally don’t get “gender protection” (as Sojourner Truth asked “ain’t i a woman?”). We have been deemed “less feminine”so it’s not surprising folks think we are so hardcore/tough we can fight anybody and be okay.  It’s why folks cannot connect to the pain/tears/emotions of black women. Also, the fact that black women/people have to be “perfect victims” to gain support/sympathy.  If you have ever done drugs, been involved in criminal activity, picked less than the perfect partner, etc., forget it. You become just another lowlife black person in some folks eyes.

It’s disturbing that so many black women gone missing without much outrage. Many of these women have been missing since they were little girls/decades. It’s time for true equality in the representation of missing persons in media.

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