Get Hard

Le sigh. I don’t know whose cooning/new black antics are worse Kevin Hart, Raven-Symoné, or Kayne West (okay, okay…West will always take the cake). Between his anti-black woman sentiments (and to me) unfunny standup shows, Hart is a close runner-up. Why is that every five years we are subjected to a film featuring one white dude/one black dude, and the black dude is always teaching the white dude how to be hip (the only exception to this is Queen Latifah’s Bringing Down the House).

Get-Hard-Poster-2

Mark Hughes wrote an interesting review of this movie. He tried to make the film sound deeper than what it is. In the end it’s still a white man’s story, with a goofy black side kick.

A Litany For Survival: the Life and Work of Audre Lorde

March is Women’s History Month.

“Women’s History Month is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. It is celebrated during March in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia, corresponding with International Women’s Day on March 8, and during October in Canada, corresponding with the celebration of Persons Day on October 18.”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women’s_History_Month

While we tend to be a bit more open talking about racism in this country, we fail to discuss the hatred of women that permeates in our society. It’s not hard to pick up on the loathing via mainstream media.

As a Black woman, I often have to navigate high levels of anti-blackness/femaleness in my daily encounters with white folks/men.

Black feminist scholar Moya Bailey coined the term “Misogynoir” to speak to the unique form of hostility that is geared towards Black women simply for being Black and women (Yes, Madonna and Patricia Arquette you can be both).

While I haven’t been able to do too much for Women’s History Month, I was able to attend a film showing of “A Litany For Survival: the Life and Work of Audre Lorde.”

Audre Lorde tends to be revered in feminists communities. After watching the documentary it became clear why the self-proclaimed “black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet,” is loved. Lorde was a great creative spirit/orator/intellectual.

It was hard to watch the latter years of her life, as she battled cancer. There was one scene (I can’t remember if she was with her daughter or a friend) but even as she could barely speak/was weak from cancer, she was brainstorming how to put an activist conference together. Her daughter/friend told her “No, I wanted us to talk about you doing something fun.” Lorde titled her head slightly and let out a soft sigh.  She had a small smile on her face. She was a thinker/organizer until the end.

I highly recommend the film. The documentary made me realize that Black women intellectuals don’t get enough shine in or out the Black community. Pop stars, actresses, fashinonistas do…but not our Black women intellectuals. Black women pretty much still have to be oversexualized or playing Mammy to get some love.

If you do nothing else this Women’s History Month, at least check out this documentary 🙂

Brownstone

I was shocked to hear about the death of  Maxee Maxwell. The singer was one of the founding members of 90’s girl group–Brownstone.

It always throws me for a loop when I hear about musical artists from my generation passing away. From Heavy D to Guru to now Maxee it always seems like a little bit of my own soul is dying.

Also,  these tragedies force me think more about the reality of death knocking on my door.  Time goes by so fast.

Rest in peace Maxwell.

Brownstone was an underrated group and often overlooked in favor for En Vogue, SWV, and ’em.

Overall, 90’s Black women singers/artists will forever ish on contemporary singers (yeah, I said it).

Of course, Brownstone’s classic song. Happy weekend 🙂