Tag Archives: black women writers

The Black Girl Magic Lit Mag Horror Issue

One of my writing goals for 2016 was to do more fiction writing. I’ve been having several short stories swirling around in my head. I’ve received a lot of rejection emails. So, I was pleasantly surprised when Black Girl Magic Lit Magazine accepted one of my stories…this past summer. It was a dream come true. I tried again for their horror submissions call, but alas it was not meant to be. I’m not hurt, though. Reading some of the excerpts from the latest issue, I can tell the competition was stiff! So grab their first horror edition. It’s a great way to get some early Halloween scares in 🙂

bgm_20the_20horror_20issue_20lg

STANDING IN THE MIDDLE OF A SECRET

On Facebook, I am in a group of dynamic Black writers/poets/dancers/visual artists. I have no idea how I got invited into the group, as I possess none of these skills, but I love the group as I am privy to exciting new work by other members.

Rosalind Bell is a writer and urban farmer. She has started an Indiegogo campaign to help fund a research project examining her family history/legacy.

“I ask for your financial help and support in my endeavor to discover, research and tell the stories of my ancestors and in so doing, tell the story of Louisiana before and after the Civil War, and unravel the secret of me.  How, in one of the most inhospitable to black life places in the whole wide world could both my progenitors have purchased the land? My first mother’s grandparents bought over 700 acres starting in 1881. And how were they able to secure it in the face of documented racist treachery. STANDING IN THE MIDDLE OF A SECRET is as much a research project as it is a writing project. I must scour microfilm, parish and state records, attics, books and people to get what I am looking for. I am seeking $29,000 to cover this expedition.” https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/help-fund-standing-in-the-middle-of-a-secret#/story

Sounds interesting, eh.  And check out the perks! Goodness, a Louisiana Meat Lovers Delivery, Gumbo Fest, and more!

Support and/or share with your networks if you can!

fsuaewcs9jnzx3cs5bca
Rosalind Bell an urban farmer.

A Litany For Survival: the Life and Work of Audre Lorde

March is Women’s History Month.

“Women’s History Month is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. It is celebrated during March in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia, corresponding with International Women’s Day on March 8, and during October in Canada, corresponding with the celebration of Persons Day on October 18.”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women’s_History_Month

While we tend to be a bit more open talking about racism in this country, we fail to discuss the hatred of women that permeates in our society. It’s not hard to pick up on the loathing via mainstream media.

As a Black woman, I often have to navigate high levels of anti-blackness/femaleness in my daily encounters with white folks/men.

Black feminist scholar Moya Bailey coined the term “Misogynoir” to speak to the unique form of hostility that is geared towards Black women simply for being Black and women (Yes, Madonna and Patricia Arquette you can be both).

While I haven’t been able to do too much for Women’s History Month, I was able to attend a film showing of “A Litany For Survival: the Life and Work of Audre Lorde.”

Audre Lorde tends to be revered in feminists communities. After watching the documentary it became clear why the self-proclaimed “black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet,” is loved. Lorde was a great creative spirit/orator/intellectual.

It was hard to watch the latter years of her life, as she battled cancer. There was one scene (I can’t remember if she was with her daughter or a friend) but even as she could barely speak/was weak from cancer, she was brainstorming how to put an activist conference together. Her daughter/friend told her “No, I wanted us to talk about you doing something fun.” Lorde titled her head slightly and let out a soft sigh.  She had a small smile on her face. She was a thinker/organizer until the end.

I highly recommend the film. The documentary made me realize that Black women intellectuals don’t get enough shine in or out the Black community. Pop stars, actresses, fashinonistas do…but not our Black women intellectuals. Black women pretty much still have to be oversexualized or playing Mammy to get some love.

If you do nothing else this Women’s History Month, at least check out this documentary 🙂

Support Sonia Sanchez Documentary

I remember watching an interview with black writers (awhile back), and Sonia Sanchez was on the panel. She was still fiery/soulful as ever, but I was shocked at how much older she looked. Sometimes we forget, our trailblazers do/will grow older (and eventually pass away). That’s why it’s so important we archive/document their work, especially with black women writers, as they tend to be too easily erased from history.  I mean it took Alice Walker to breath new life into the work of Zora Neale Hurston. If she hadn’t, Ms. Hurston would still be forgotten in an unmarked grave. We cannot allow other black women icons to fall to the wayside.

There is a new Kickstarter campaign to fund a new documentary on the life of Sonia Sanchez. Support if ya can!!

Photo From: http://www.afropoets.net/soniasanchez.html
Photo From: http://www.afropoets.net/soniasanchez.html

 

 

 

Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements

If  you consider yourself an avid reader, yet have never read or heard of Octavia Butler, for shame! No, but seriously, Octavia Butler should be on every reader’s book list. She was a gifted writer (sadly, Ms. Butler passed away in 2006), who used her talents to tackle issues on race, gender, class, sexuality, etc., within science fiction books. I understand everyone doesn’t like sci-fi, but I challenge folks to read at least one book by Octavia Butler. You will not be disappointed. I think a good starting point would be Butler’s “Kindered.” It’s a quick and easy read.

My favorite books by Octavia Butler:

Kindred

Parable of the Talents

Parable of the Sower

Xenogenesis

There are two young black women writers, working on a book, in honor of Ms. Butler. In the writers own words:“It’s an anthology of radical science and speculative fiction written by organizers and  activists.” If you can, support their Indiegogo campaign….

Happy reading!!  I will be sharing other summer book recommendations. Keep an eye out 🙂